top of page

Craft Beer Packaging Sustainability Study

Updated: May 30, 2023

Is our bottle recovery and reuse program meeting our sustainability goals?

Stanley Boots, co-founder

1 April 2023


[ Tiếng Việt bên dưới ]

This study examines the question whether 7 Bridges Brewing Company shifts from our current bottle recovery and recycling program to packaging beer in aluminum cans.


To this end, we examine several issues which point toward cans as a better and more sustainable packaging that supports our Zero Waste Mission. The key issues include:


  1. State of recycling in Vietnam

  2. Beer caps as environmental problem

  3. Energy economy of recycling aluminum vs. glass

  4. CO2 footprint of transporting cans vs. bottles

  5. Overall pollution caused by transport in Vietnam

  6. Informal economy of “pickers” in Vietnam

  7. Wastewater issues with bottle washing




Executive Summary


Our analysis of the seven factors above leads to the conclusion that we must shift from bottles to cans if we are to be true to our mission for the following reasons:


Lower carbon footprint:

The carbon footprint of aluminum cans is significantly lower than that of glass bottles, mainly due to their lighter weight. According to a study by the Beverage Industry Environmental Roundtable, the carbon footprint of aluminum cans is 31% lower than that of glass bottles. The lower weight of aluminum cans also means that fewer trucks are needed for transportation, resulting in lower transport emissions. As previously calculated, the transport carbon footprint of 100 cases of beer from Saigon to Hanoi is approximately 8,766 kg CO2 for glass bottles, while it is only 4,200 kg CO2 for aluminum cans, assuming the same distance and payload capacity.


Energy savings:

As previously mentioned, the energy requirements for recycling aluminum cans are significantly lower than those for recycling glass bottles. According to the Aluminum Association, recycling aluminum cans requires 95% less energy than producing new cans from bauxite ore. In contrast, recycling glass bottles requires about 20% more energy than producing new bottles from virgin materials, according to the Glass Packaging Institute. Switching from glass bottles to aluminum cans could therefore result in significant energy savings for the beer company.


Environmental advantages:

As previously mentioned, aluminum cans are not typically lined with plastic and therefore do not pose the same environmental risks as plastic-lined beer caps. In addition, aluminum is a highly recyclable material and can be recycled indefinitely without loss of quality. According to the Aluminum Association, more than 75% of all aluminum ever produced is still in use today, and recycling aluminum cans saves up to 95% of the energy needed to produce new cans from raw materials. By using aluminum cans, the beer company could reduce its environmental impact and promote a more sustainable beverage industry.


Picker economy:

According to a report by the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO), the informal recycling sector in Vietnam provides employment to more than 200,000 people and contributes to reducing landfill waste. Aluminum cans are highly valued in the recycling market due to their high aluminum content and easy recyclability, which can provide a valuable source of income for pickers. By using aluminum cans instead of glass bottles, the beer company could support this informal economy and help reduce waste in landfills.


Water management:

We calculate that we can save over 360,000 liters of water a year needed to wash our bottles by switching to cans.


The following seven sections provide our analysis that have led to the above conclusions.



Section 1: State of recycling in Vietnam


The landfill waste problem. Landfill waste is a growing issue in Vietnam. According to a report by the World Bank, Vietnam generated 43.5 million tonnes of municipal solid waste in 2018, of which 71% was collected and only 27% was disposed of in controlled landfills. The remaining 2% was burned or dumped in uncontrolled areas. The report notes that the waste generation in Vietnam is increasing at an average annual rate of 10%, which is among the highest in the world.


Another report by the Asian Development Bank estimates that the volume of municipal solid waste generated in Vietnam will reach 57.2 million tonnes by 2025, with only 28% of the waste being properly collected and disposed of in controlled landfills. The report notes that inadequate infrastructure and funding for waste management is a major challenge in Vietnam, which has led to widespread environmental and health problems.


Overall, these reports suggest that Vietnam is facing significant challenges in managing its municipal solid waste, with much of the waste ending up in uncontrolled dumpsites or improperly managed landfills. This highlights the urgent need for improved waste management practices, including increased recycling and more effective waste collection and disposal systems.


Recycling in Vietnam. The recycling rate in Vietnam is not well documented and can vary significantly by region and waste stream. Vietnam does not have a formal recycling system, and much of the recycling is done through informal channels, such as scavenging and waste picking. According to the Vietnam Environment Administration, only 10-15% of waste in urban areas is currently being collected for recycling, while the majority is either sent to landfill or burned.


There have been some efforts to increase recycling in Vietnam in recent years, including the adoption of a National Action Plan on Solid Waste Management for the period of 2020-2025 with a target of reducing the proportion of solid waste buried in landfills to below 50% by 2025. However, it is unclear how this target will be achieved given the lack of infrastructure and investment in recycling.

Glass bottles have been traditionally used for packaging beverages in Vietnam, and there are some efforts to recycle glass bottles in the country. However, the recycling rate for glass bottles is generally low due to the lack of efficient collection and sorting systems, as well as low public awareness and motivation to recycle.


On the other hand, the recycling of aluminum cans has been increasing in recent years in Vietnam. The government and private sectors are actively promoting aluminum can recycling as a way to reduce waste and conserve resources. In some areas, there are established networks of collectors and recyclers for aluminum cans, and some beverage companies have set up recycling programs and facilities to encourage customers to return their used cans.


Overall, the state of recycling in Vietnam is still in its early stages, and more efforts are needed to improve the infrastructure and awareness for recycling of both glass bottles and aluminum cans. It should be noted that the trend towards aluminum can recycling is generally more positive in the country.


Section 2: Beer caps as environmental problem


There is no program for recycling beer caps (crowns) in Vietnam. They go into the waste stream and are not likely even recovered by the picker economy. Most beer caps are made of metal (usually steel or aluminum) and are recyclable. However, most beer caps may have plastic liners or other non-recyclable components, especially polyethylene (PE) and polypropylene (PP), which makes them difficult to recycle.


When PE and PP decompose in landfills, they can undergo various chemical and physical breakdown processes that result in the release of different compounds and gasses as follows:

  1. Chemical breakdown: Under the anaerobic conditions of landfills, PE and PP beer crown liners can undergo a process known as hydrolysis, in which water molecules react with the polymer chains to break them down into smaller units. This process can release compounds such as acetic acid, methane, and carbon dioxide into the surrounding environment. The exact nature and amount of these compounds depend on the specific conditions of the landfill, such as temperature, moisture, and pH. Some of the potential chemicals that may be released from plastic-lined beer caps in landfills include:

    1. Bisphenol A (BPA): BPA is a chemical commonly used in the production of polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins. It is a known endocrine disruptor that can mimic estrogen and affect hormonal balance. Some plastic-lined beer caps may contain BPA, and when they decompose in landfills, they can release the chemical into the surrounding soil and groundwater.

    2. Phthalates: Phthalates are a group of chemicals used as plasticizers to make plastics more flexible and durable. They have been linked to reproductive and developmental problems, as well as other health effects. Some plastic-lined beer caps may contain phthalates, and when they decompose in landfills, they can release the chemicals into the environment.

    3. Polyethylene (PE) and Polypropylene (PP): These are two of the most common types of plastic used in beer cap liners. When they decompose in landfills, they can release various chemicals into the surrounding environment, including greenhouse gases such as methane and carbon dioxide.

  2. Physical breakdown: PE and PP beer crown liners can also undergo physical breakdown in landfills or when left exposed in the environment, as they are exposed to the mechanical stresses of compaction and other waste management activities. This can result in the fragmentation of the plastic into smaller particles, which can then be transported by wind or water to other areas of the landfill or the surrounding environment. These small plastic particles, known as microplastics, can persist in the environment for many years and can have harmful effects on wildlife and ecosystems.

  3. Leaching: As the PE and PP beer crown liners break down in landfills, they can release various chemicals into the surrounding soil and groundwater. These chemicals can include plasticizers, stabilizers, and other additives used in the manufacturing of the plastic, as well as any contaminants that may have been absorbed during the use or disposal of the product. The release of these chemicals can lead to the contamination of local ecosystems and potentially affect human health.



Section 3: Energy economy of recycling aluminum vs. glass


When it comes to the energy economics of recycling glass beer bottles and aluminum beer cans, there are some key differences to consider.


First, it takes less energy to produce new aluminum cans from recycled aluminum than it does to produce new cans from raw materials. According to the Aluminum Association, using recycled aluminum to make new cans requires 95% less energy than producing new cans from bauxite ore, the primary raw material for aluminum production. This means that recycling aluminum cans can significantly reduce the energy needed for manufacturing new cans.


In contrast, recycling glass beer bottles requires more energy than producing new bottles from raw materials. This is because the process of recycling glass involves melting down the used glass and reforming it into new bottles, which requires significant amounts of heat and energy. According to the Glass Packaging Institute, producing new glass bottles from recycled glass requires about 20% more energy than producing new bottles from virgin materials.


However, the energy economics of recycling glass bottles versus aluminum cans can also depend on the transportation distance and other factors. For example, if the recycling facility for glass bottles is located far away from the source of the used bottles, the energy needed for transportation can increase the overall energy requirements for the recycling process. Similarly, the energy needed for transporting aluminum cans to the recycling facility can also increase the overall energy requirements.


In addition, the energy economics of recycling glass bottles versus aluminum cans can vary depending on the specific methods and technologies used for recycling. For example, more efficient recycling processes or the use of renewable energy sources can reduce the energy requirements for both glass and aluminum recycling.


Overall, while recycling aluminum cans requires less energy than recycling glass bottles, the energy economics of both depend on a number of factors, including transportation distance, recycling technology, and energy sources used. As noted, Vietnam lacks a strong glass recycling program whereas aluminum cans are recycled.



Section 4: CO2 footprint of transporting cans vs. bottles


In this section we examine some calculations of the carbon footprint of moving beer packaged in glass bottles vs. aluminum cans around Vietnam. The calculations are based on studies in the US and Europe of the carbon footprint of transport. Certain assumptions, such as the CO2 release of Vietnamese diesel trucks is not available. In fact, the CO2 release can be expected to be greater than vehicles in countries with stricter emission controls. A study by the Aluminum Association (2010) and the Can Manufacturers Institute (2010) found that the carbon footprint of a 12-ounce aluminum beverage can is 1,612 grams of CO2 equivalent per kilogram of aluminum, which includes the entire life cycle of the can (production, transportation, and recycling). In comparison, the carbon footprint of a 12-ounce glass bottle is 6,000 grams of CO2 equivalent per kilogram of glass (Vickers, 2011). Our findings show an even higher CO2 footprint caused by the higher weight of our reusable bottles.


For purposes of this section, we reduce the basic calculations to a unit and case basis, as follows:


Glass bottles:

The weight of an empty glass bottle is 325 g, and the weight of a full glass bottle is approximately 1,005 g (assuming the beer weighs around 330 g).

The total weight of 24 glass bottles (one case) of beer would be:

24 x (325 g + 1,005 g) = 29.88 kg

Using the same formula as above, the total CO2 emissions from transporting one case of beer (29.88 kg) from Saigon to Hanoi would be:

(29.88 kg x 1,200 km) x (170 g CO2/tonne-km) / 1,000,000 = 5.10 kg CO2


Cans:

The weight of an empty aluminum can is approximately 16 g, and the weight of a full can is approximately 346 g (assuming the beer weighs around 330 g).

The total weight of 24 aluminum cans (one case) of beer would be:

24 x (16 g + 346 g) = 8.64 kg


Using the same formula as above, the total CO2 emissions from transporting one case of beer (8.64 kg) from Saigon to Hanoi would be:

(8.64 kg x 1,200 km) x (170 g CO2/tonne-km) / 1,000,000 = 1.47 kg CO2


Conclusion transporting beer in cans has nearly a 6-fold lower CO2 footprint compared to transporting beer in glass bottles due to the significantly lower weight of the packaging material.


Section 5: Overall pollution caused by transport in Vietnam


In this section we consider a scenario where we are transporting 100 cases of beer from Saigon to Hanoi.

The environmental impact of diesel truck transport in Vietnam, where there is little regulation of truck emissions, can be significant, especially for long-distance transportation such as from Saigon to Hanoi.

To present a scenario of transporting 100 cases of beer from Saigon to Hanoi, let's assume the following:

  • The distance between Saigon and Hanoi is approximately 1,200 km

  • The transport is carried out by a diesel truck with a payload capacity of 10 tonnes (assuming each case of beer weighs around 24 kg)

  • The truck has an average fuel consumption rate of 20 liters per 100 km, and emits 2.68 kg of CO2 per liter of diesel burned.

Based on these assumptions, the total amount of diesel consumed for transporting 100 cases of beer from Saigon to Hanoi would be approximately:


100 cases x 24 kg per case = 2,400 kg

2,400 kg / 10 tonnes = 0.24 tonnes of beer

0.24 tonnes x 1,200 km = 288 tonne-km

Using the emissions rate of 2.68 kg of CO2 per liter of diesel burned, the total amount of CO2 emissions from the diesel truck transport would be:

288 tonne-km x 0.17 kg CO2/tonne-km x 20 liters/100 km x 2.68 kg CO2/liter = 8,766 kg CO2


Unfortunately, in a country like Vietnam where there is little regulation of truck emissions, the actual amount of emissions from the diesel truck may be higher than these calculations, as many trucks in the country do not have modern emission control systems or may be using low-quality diesel fuel. The emissions can include not only CO2 but also other harmful pollutants such as nitrogen oxides (NOx), particulate matter (PM), and sulfur dioxide (SO2).


These emissions can have significant negative impacts on the environment and human health, including air pollution, climate change, respiratory diseases, and cardiovascular problems.


Conclusion: we must reduce the weight of our shipments to reduce the overall negative impact of truck transportation in Vietnam.


Section 6: Informal economy of “pickers” in Vietnam


In Vietnam there is an informal economy of pickers who remove and sell aluminum cans from garbage. Please expound on the economics of such pickers and how it reduces landfill waste.


In Vietnam, the informal economy of pickers who remove and sell aluminum cans from garbage has a number of economic and environmental benefits, including reducing landfill waste and generating income for the pickers themselves.

Aluminum cans are highly recyclable and have a high market value as a commodity, making them a valuable resource that can be recovered from the waste stream. In Vietnam, many households and businesses dispose of their aluminum cans along with other waste, which would otherwise end up in landfills or littered in the environment. However, pickers who collect aluminum cans from garbage can recover these valuable resources and sell them to recycling companies or other intermediaries.


The economic benefits of aluminum can picking can be significant, particularly for low-income individuals and families who may not have other sources of income. The prices paid for aluminum cans can vary depending on market conditions, but in general, they are higher than the prices paid for other recyclable materials such as plastic or paper. By collecting and selling aluminum cans, pickers can earn a steady income that can help support themselves and their families.


In addition to the economic benefits, aluminum can picking also has environmental benefits. By removing aluminum cans from the waste stream, pickers help reduce the amount of waste that ends up in landfills, where it can take many years to decompose and release harmful chemicals into the environment. Additionally, recycling aluminum cans requires less energy and resources than producing new cans from raw materials, which reduces the carbon footprint of the beverage industry.


Section 7: Wastewater issues with bottle washing


Since 2018 we have implemented a bottle recovery and reuse program with the goal of ensuring all of our high quality reusable bottles stay in circulation. We were inspired by programs in Germany and Oregon which achieve high levels of reuse.


As 7 Bridges expanded its reach beyond Central, we found this program is not as effective. Many customers did not have a way to store their bottles and simply dumped them into the garbage stream. In addition, transport of the empty bottles poses a carbon footprint issue as discussed above. Finally, bottle losses are now higher than 50% due to the impossibility of recovery from around Vietnam.


A key issue we noted is the amount of water, caustic cleaner and acid rinse necessary to properly clean and sanitize the bottles. Whilst our wastewater Vetiver pond did a near perfect job of recycling the water, we found we use an enormous amount of fresh water to clean the bottles.


By switching from bottles to cans, the brewery eliminates the need for washing and reusing bottles. This saves not only water but also the energy and chemicals (such as caustics and acid rinse) needed for the washing process.


It is estimated that a typical bottle washer uses 3 liters of water per bottle (Krones, 2021). As an example (somewhat close to our facts) of cleaning over 10,000 bottles per month, we would need about 30,000 liters of water per month, or 360,000 liters annually, to maintain our bottle washing system. And…our system is not as efficient as a Krones washing machine.


Conclusion: with bottle losses, transport emissions, lack of customer participation in our program and high water consumption, it is sadly better to not recover and reuse the bottles. Cans eliminate these issues and will save water.



Sources:

  • Aluminum Association and Can Manufacturers Institute (2010). Life Cycle Assessment of Aluminum Beverage Cans.

  • Bren School of Environmental Science & Management (2021). Emissions from Diesel Trucks.

  • Krones (2021). Bottle Washing Technology.

  • Vickers, D. (2011). Environmental Life Cycle Assessment of Drinking Containers. The International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, 16(3), 224-234.


 

Nghiên cứu về tính bền vững cho bao bì bia thủ công


Chương trình thu hồi và tái sử dụng chai của chúng tôi có đáp ứng được các mục tiêu phát triển bền vững?

Stanley Boots, Đồng sáng lập 7 Bridges Brewing Co.

1/4/2023


Nghiên cứu này nhằm xem xét câu hỏi liệu Công ty sản xuất bia 7 Bridges có nên thay đổi từ chương trình thu hồi và tái chế chai hiện tại sang đóng gói bia trong lon nhôm hay không.

Để trả lời câu hỏi này, chúng tôi xem xét một số nghiên cứu chỉ ra rằng lon nhôm là một loại bao bì tốt hơn và bền vững hơn để hỗ trợ Sứ mệnh Không chất thải (Zero Waste Mission) của chúng tôi. Các nghiên cứu chính bao gồm:

  1. Hiện trạng nền công nghiệp tái chế tại Việt Nam

  2. Nắp bia cũng là vấn đề môi trường

  3. Tiết kiệm năng lượng trong quy trình tái chế lon nhôm so với chai thủy tinh

  4. Khí thải CO2 trong quá trình vận chuyển lon nhôm so với chai thủy tinh

  5. Mức độ ô nhiễm trong việc vận chuyển ở Việt Nam

  6. Kinh tế phi chính thức của “ve chai” ở Việt Nam

  7. Các vấn đề về nước thải khi rửa chai thủy tinh



Tóm tắt dự án

Phân tích của chúng tôi về bảy yếu tố trên dẫn đến kết luận rằng chúng tôi phải thay đổi việc sản xuất chai thủy tinh sang lon nhôm để đạt được sứ mệnh của doanh nghiệp vì những lý do sau:


*Dấu chân carbon thấp hơn (*“Carbon footprint”, là tổng lượng mức độ của khí thải nhà kính xuất phát từ quá trình sản xuất, sử dụng các sản phẩm công nghiệp hoặc dịch vụ của con người và cũng là vòng đời cuối cùng của một sản phẩm hoặc dịch vụ đó):


Dấu chân carbon trong việc sản xuất lon nhôm thấp hơn đáng kể so với chai thủy tinh, chủ yếu là do trọng lượng nhẹ hơn. Theo một nghiên cứu của Hội nghị bàn tròn về môi trường ngành công nghiệp nước giải khát (Beverage Industry Environmental Roundtable), dấu chân carbon của lon nhôm thấp hơn 31% so với chai thủy tinh. Lon nhôm có trọng lượng thấp hơn cũng có nghĩa là cần ít xe tải hơn để vận chuyển, dẫn đến lượng khí thải khi vận chuyển thấp hơn. Theo tính toán trước đây, lượng khí thải carbon vận chuyển của 100 thùng bia từ Sài Gòn ra Hà Nội là khoảng 8,766 kg CO2 đối với chai thủy tinh, trong khi đó chỉ có 4,200 kg CO2 đối với lon nhôm, với cùng khoảng cách và tải trọng.


Tiết kiệm năng lượng:

Như đã đề cập trước đó, yêu cầu năng lượng để tái chế lon nhôm thấp hơn đáng kể so với yêu cầu tái chế chai thủy tinh. Theo Hiệp hội Nhôm (Aluminum Association), tái chế lon nhôm cần ít năng lượng hơn 95% so với sản xuất lon mới từ quặng bauxite. Ngược lại, tái chế chai thủy tinh cần nhiều năng lượng hơn khoảng 20% so với sản xuất chai mới từ vật liệu nguyên chất, theo Viện Bao bì Thủy tinh (Glass Packaging Institute). Do đó, việc chuyển từ chai thủy tinh sang lon nhôm có thể giúp tiết kiệm năng lượng đáng kể cho doanh nghiệp.


Tác động tích cực đến môi trường:

Như đã đề cập ở trên, lon nhôm thường không được lót bằng nhựa và do đó không gây ra các rủi ro về môi trường giống như nắp bia có lót bằng nhựa. Ngoài ra, nhôm là vật liệu có khả năng tái chế cao và có thể được tái chế vô thời hạn mà không làm giảm chất lượng. Theo Hiệp hội Nhôm (Aluminum Association), hơn 75% tổng số nhôm từng được sản xuất vẫn đang được sử dụng cho đến ngày nay và việc tái chế lon nhôm giúp tiết kiệm tới 95% năng lượng cần thiết để sản xuất lon mới từ nguyên liệu thô. Bằng cách sử dụng lon nhôm, công ty bia có thể giảm tác động đến môi trường và thúc đẩy ngành công nghiệp đồ uống bền vững hơn.


Nền kinh tế “ve chai”:

Theo báo cáo của Tổ chức Phát triển Công nghiệp Liên hợp quốc (UNIDO), lĩnh vực tái chế phi chính thức này tại Việt Nam tạo việc làm cho hơn 200.000 người và góp phần giảm lượng rác chôn lấp. Lon nhôm được đánh giá cao trên thị trường tái chế do hàm lượng nhôm cao và khả năng tái chế dễ dàng, có thể mang lại nguồn thu nhập quý giá cho những người thu gom ve chai. Bằng cách sử dụng lon nhôm thay vì chai thủy tinh, công ty bia có thể hỗ trợ nền kinh tế phi chính thức này và giúp giảm chất thải tại các bãi chôn lấp.


Tiết kiệm nguồn nước:

Theo tính toán, chúng tôi có thể tiết kiệm hơn 360.000 lít nước mỗi năm cần thiết để rửa chai thủy tinh bằng cách chuyển sang sử dụng lon nhôm.


Bảy mục sau đây sẽ cung cấp phân tích của chúng tôi đã dẫn đến các kết luận trên.




Mục 1: Hiện trạng nền công nghiệp tái chế tại Việt Nam

Vấn đề chôn lấp rác thải. Chất thải chôn lấp là một vấn đề đang gia tăng nhanh chóng ở Việt Nam. Theo báo cáo của Ngân hàng Thế giới (World Bank), Việt Nam đã tạo ra 43,5 triệu tấn chất thải rắn đô thị trong năm 2018, trong đó 71% được thu gom và chỉ 27% được xử lý tại các bãi chôn lấp có kiểm soát. 2% còn lại được đốt hoặc đổ ở những khu vực không được kiểm soát. Báo cáo lưu ý rằng lượng chất thải phát sinh ở Việt Nam đang gia tăng với tốc độ trung bình hàng năm là 10%, thuộc hàng cao nhất trên thế giới.


Một báo cáo khác của Ngân hàng Phát triển Châu Á (Asian Development Bank) ước tính khối lượng chất thải rắn đô thị phát sinh ở Việt Nam sẽ đạt 57,2 triệu tấn vào năm 2025, với chỉ 28% chất thải được thu gom và xử lý đúng cách tại các bãi chôn lấp có kiểm soát. Báo cáo lưu ý rằng cơ sở hạ tầng và kinh phí quản lý chất thải bị thiếu hụt là một thách thức lớn ở Việt Nam, dẫn đến gia tăng các vấn đề nghiêm trọng về môi trường và sức khỏe.


Nhìn chung, các báo cáo này cho thấy Việt Nam đang phải đối mặt với những thách thức đáng kể trong việc quản lý chất thải rắn đô thị, với phần lớn chất thải sẽ bị đổ tại các bãi rác không được kiểm soát hoặc các bãi chôn lấp không được quản lý đúng cách. Điều này nhấn mạnh nhu cầu cấp thiết phải cải thiện hoạt động quản lý chất thải, bao gồm tăng cường tái chế và các hệ thống thu gom, xử lý chất thải hiệu quả hơn.


Hiện trạng tái chế tại Việt Nam. Tỷ lệ tái chế ở Việt Nam không được ghi chép đầy đủ, con số sẽ thay đổi đáng kể theo khu vực và dòng chất thải. Việt Nam không có hệ thống tái chế chính thức và phần lớn việc tái chế được thực hiện thông qua các hình thức không chính thức, chẳng hạn như nhặt rác và ve chai. Theo Tổng cục Môi trường, hiện chỉ có 10-15% chất thải ở các đô thị được thu gom để tái chế, trong khi phần lớn được đưa đến bãi chôn lấp hoặc đốt.


Việt Nam đã có một số nỗ lực nhằm tăng cường tái chế trong những năm gần đây, bao gồm việc thông qua Kế hoạch hành động quốc gia về quản lý chất thải rắn giai đoạn 2020-2025 với mục tiêu giảm tỷ lệ chất thải rắn được chôn lấp tại các bãi chôn lấp xuống dưới 50%. đến năm 2025. Tuy nhiên, vẫn chưa rõ mục tiêu này sẽ đạt được như thế trước thách thức về thiếu cơ sở hạ tầng và đầu tư vào tái chế.


Chai thủy tinh thường được sử dụng để đóng gói đồ uống ở Việt Nam và đã có nhiều nỗ lực để tái chế chai thủy tinh trong nước. Tuy nhiên, tỷ lệ tái chế chai thủy tinh nhìn chung còn thấp do thiếu hệ thống thu gom và phân loại hiệu quả, cũng như nhận thức và động lực tham gia tái chế của cộng đồng còn thấp.


Mặt khác, việc tái chế lon nhôm đang được phát triển trong những năm gần đây tại Việt Nam. Chính phủ và các doanh nghiệp tư nhân đang tích cực thúc đẩy tái chế lon nhôm nhằm giảm thiểu chất thải và bảo tồn tài nguyên. Ở một số khu vực, hệ thống thu gom và tái chế lon nhôm đã được thiết lập. Một số công ty nước giải khát đã thiết lập các chương trình và cơ sở tái chế để khuyến khích khách hàng hoàn trả lon đã qua sử dụng.


Nhìn chung, tình trạng tái chế ở Việt Nam vẫn còn ở giai đoạn mới phát triển và cần nhiều nỗ lực hơn nữa để cải thiện cơ sở hạ tầng và nâng cao nhận thức về tái chế cả chai thủy tinh và lon nhôm. Cũng lưu ý rằng, xu hướng tái chế lon nhôm nói chung hiện đang là giải pháp hiệu quả hơn tại Việt Nam.



Mục 2: Nắp bia cũng là vấn đề môi trường

Hiện tại, Việt Nam chưa có hệ thống hay cơ sở tái chế nắp chai. Chúng đi vào dòng chất thải và thậm chí không có khả năng được thu hồi bởi nhân lực thu gom rác thải, ve chai. Hầu hết nắp bia được làm bằng kim loại (thường là chất liệu thép hoặc nhôm) và có thể tái chế. Tuy nhiên, hầu hết các nắp bia có thể có lớp lót bằng nhựa hoặc các thành phần không thể tái chế khác, đặc biệt là polyetylen (PE) và polypropylen (PP), khiến việc tái chế khó khăn hơn.


Khi PE và PP phân hủy trong bãi chôn lấp, chúng có thể trải qua các quá trình phân hủy vật lý và hóa học khác nhau dẫn đến giải phóng các hợp chất và khí khác nhau như sau:

  1. Phân hủy hóa học: Trong điều kiện yếm khí của bãi chôn lấp, lớp lót trên nắp chai bia bằng PE và PP có thể trải qua một quá trình gọi là thủy phân, trong đó các phân tử nước phản ứng với chuỗi polyme để phá vỡ chúng thành các đơn vị nhỏ hơn. Quá trình này có thể giải phóng các hợp chất như axit axetic, metan và carbon dioxide vào môi trường xung quanh. Bản chất và lượng chính xác của các hợp chất này phụ thuộc vào các điều kiện cụ thể của bãi chôn lấp, chẳng hạn như nhiệt độ, độ ẩm và độ pH. Một số hóa chất có thể được giải phóng từ nắp bia lót bằng nhựa trong bãi chôn lấp bao gồm:

  2. Bisphenol A (BPA): BPA là hóa chất thường được sử dụng trong sản xuất nhựa polycarbonate và nhựa epoxy. Nó là một chất gây rối loạn nội tiết được biết đến có thể bắt chước estrogen và ảnh hưởng đến sự cân bằng nội tiết tố. Một số nắp bia lót bằng nhựa có thể chứa BPA, và khi chúng phân hủy ở các bãi chôn lấp, chúng có thể giải phóng hóa chất này vào đất và nước ngầm xung quanh.

  3. Phthalates: là một nhóm hóa chất được sử dụng làm chất dẻo để làm cho nhựa dẻo và bền hơn. Chúng có liên quan đến các vấn đề về sinh sản và phát triển, cũng như các ảnh hưởng sức khỏe khác. Một số nắp bia lót bằng nhựa có thể chứa phthalate và khi chúng phân hủy ở các bãi chôn lấp, chúng có thể giải phóng các hóa chất này ra môi trường.

  4. Polyethylene (PE) và Polypropylene (PP): Đây là hai loại nhựa phổ biến nhất được sử dụng làm lót nắp bia. Khi chúng bị phân hủy trong các bãi chôn lấp, chúng có thể thải ra nhiều loại hóa chất khác nhau vào môi trường xung quanh, bao gồm các loại khí nhà kính như mêtan và carbon dioxide.

  5. Phân hủy vật lý: Lớp lót trên nắp chai bia bằng PE và PP cũng có thể bị phân hủy vật lý trong bãi chôn lấp hoặc khi để ngoài môi trường, vì chúng phải chịu các ứng suất cơ học trong quá trình nén và các hoạt động xử lý chất thải khác. Điều này có thể dẫn đến sự phân mảnh nhựa thành các hạt nhỏ hơn, sau đó các hạt này có thể được gió hoặc nước đẩy đến các khu vực khác của bãi chôn lấp hoặc môi trường xung quanh. Những hạt nhựa nhỏ này, được gọi là vi nhựa, có thể tồn tại trong môi trường trong nhiều năm và có thể gây hại cho động vật hoang dã và hệ sinh thái.

  6. Rò rỉ: Khi lớp lót trên nắp chai bia bằng PE và PP bị phân mảnh trong bãi chôn lấp, chúng có thể giải phóng nhiều loại hóa chất vào đất và nước ngầm xung quanh. Những hóa chất này có thể bao gồm chất làm dẻo, chất ổn định và các chất phụ gia khác được sử dụng trong sản xuất nhựa, cũng như bất kỳ chất gây ô nhiễm nào có thể đã được hấp thụ trong quá trình sử dụng hoặc thải bỏ sản phẩm. Việc giải phóng các hóa chất này có thể dẫn đến ô nhiễm hệ sinh thái địa phương và có khả năng ảnh hưởng đến sức khỏe con người.



Mục 3: Tiết kiệm năng lượng trong quy trình tái chế lon nhôm so với chai thủy tinh

Khi nói đến tiết kiệm năng lượng trong quy trình tái chế chai bia thủy tinh và lon bia nhôm, có một số điểm khác biệt chính cần xem xét.

Thứ nhất, sản xuất lon nhôm mới từ nhôm tái chế tốn ít năng lượng hơn so với sản xuất lon mới từ nguyên liệu thô. Theo Hiệp hội Nhôm (Aluminum Association), sử dụng nhôm tái chế để sản xuất lon mới cần ít năng lượng hơn 95% so với sản xuất lon mới từ quặng bauxite, nguyên liệu chính để sản xuất nhôm. Điều này có nghĩa là việc tái chế lon nhôm có thể làm giảm đáng kể năng lượng cần thiết để sản xuất lon mới.


Ngược lại, tái chế chai bia thủy tinh cần nhiều năng lượng hơn so với sản xuất chai mới từ nguyên liệu thô. Điều này là do quá trình tái chế thủy tinh liên quan đến việc nấu chảy thủy tinh đã sử dụng và tái chế nó thành chai mới, đòi hỏi một lượng nhiệt và năng lượng đáng kể. Theo Viện Bao bì Thủy tinh (Glass Packaging Institute), sản xuất chai thủy tinh mới từ thủy tinh tái chế cần năng lượng nhiều hơn khoảng 20% so với sản xuất chai mới từ nguyên liệu thô.


Tuy nhiên, về hiệu quả kinh tế sử dụng năng lượng trong quá trình tái chế chai thủy tinh so với lon nhôm cũng có thể phụ thuộc vào khoảng cách vận chuyển và các yếu tố khác. Ví dụ: nếu cơ sở tái chế chai thủy tinh nằm cách xa nguồn chai đã qua sử dụng, thì năng lượng cần thiết cho việc vận chuyển có thể làm tăng nhu cầu sử dụng năng lượng cho quy trình tái chế. Tương tự, năng lượng cần thiết để vận chuyển lon nhôm đến cơ sở tái chế cũng có thể làm tăng nhu cầu năng lượng tổng thể.


Ngoài ra, hiệu quả kinh tế năng lượng của việc tái chế chai thủy tinh so với lon nhôm có thể khác nhau tùy thuộc vào các phương pháp và công nghệ cụ thể được sử dụng trong quy trình tái chế. Ví dụ, quy trình tái chế hiệu quả hơn hoặc sử dụng các nguồn năng lượng tái tạo có thể giảm nhu cầu năng lượng cho cả tái chế thủy tinh và nhôm.


Nhìn chung, trong khi tái chế lon nhôm cần ít năng lượng hơn so với tái chế chai thủy tinh, tính kinh tế năng lượng của cả hai loại này phụ thuộc vào một số yếu tố, bao gồm khoảng cách vận chuyển, công nghệ tái chế và nguồn năng lượng được sử dụng. Như đã lưu ý, Việt Nam đang thiếu chương trình, cơ sở tái chế thủy tinh hiệu quả so với tái chế nhôm.



Mục 4: Khí thải CO2 trong quá trình vận chuyển lon nhôm so với chai thủy tinh

Trong phần này, chúng tôi xem xét một số tính toán về lượng khí thải carbon trong quá trình vận chuyển bia trong chai thủy tinh so với lon nhôm trên khắp Việt Nam. Tính toán dựa trên các nghiên cứu ở Hoa Kỳ và Châu Âu về dấu chân carbon trong quá trình vận chuyển. Một số giả định về lượng khí thải CO2 của xe tải chạy bằng dầu diesel tại Việt Nam hiện chưa được nghiên cứu. Trên thực tế, lượng CO2 thải ra có thể lớn hơn so với các phương tiện ở các quốc gia có kiểm soát khí thải chặt chẽ hơn. Một nghiên cứu của Hiệp hội nhôm (2010) và Viện các nhà sản xuất lon (Can Manufacturers Institute) (2010) cho thấy lượng khí thải carbon của lon nước giải khát bằng nhôm 12 ounce là 1,612 gam CO2 tương đương trên mỗi kg nhôm, bao gồm toàn bộ vòng đời của lon nhôm (sản xuất, vận chuyển và tái chế). Để so sánh, lượng khí thải carbon của một chai thủy tinh 12 ounce là 6,000 gram CO2 tương đương trên mỗi kg thủy tinh (Vickers, 2011). Nghiên cứu của chúng tôi cho thấy lượng khí thải CO2 thậm chí còn cao hơn do các chai thủy tinh có thể tái sử dụng của chúng tôi có trọng lượng cao hơn.


Trong phần này, chúng tôi thực hiện các tính toán cơ bản thành các đơn vị và trường hợp cơ bản như sau:


Chai thủy tinh:

Trọng lượng của một chai thủy tinh rỗng là 325 g và trọng lượng của một chai thủy tinh đầy khoảng 1,005 g (giả sử bia nặng khoảng 330 g).

Tổng trọng lượng của 24 chai thủy tinh (một thùng) bia sẽ là:

24 x (325 g + 1,005 g) = 29,88 kg

Sử dụng công thức tương tự như trên, tổng lượng khí thải CO2 từ việc vận chuyển một thùng bia (29,88 kg) từ Sài Gòn ra Hà Nội sẽ là:

(29,88 kg x 1.200 km) x (170 g CO2/tấn-km) / 1.000.000 = 5,10 kg CO2


Lon nhôm:

Trọng lượng của một lon nhôm rỗng là khoảng 16 g và trọng lượng của một lon đầy là khoảng 346 g (giả sử bia nặng khoảng 330 g).

Tổng trọng lượng của 24 lon nhôm (một thùng) bia sẽ là:

24 x (16 g + 346 g) = 8,64 kg

Sử dụng công thức tương tự như trên, tổng lượng khí thải CO2 từ việc vận chuyển một thùng bia (8,64 kg) từ Sài Gòn ra Hà Nội sẽ là:

(8,64 kg x 1.200 km) x (170 g CO2/tấn-km) / 1.000.000 = 1,47 kg CO2


Kết luận: việc vận chuyển bia trong lon nhôm có lượng khí thải CO2 thấp hơn gần 6 lần so với vận chuyển bia trong chai thủy tinh do trọng lượng của vật liệu đóng gói thấp hơn đáng kể.



Mục 5: Mức độ ô nhiễm trong việc vận chuyển ở Việt Nam

Trong phần này, chúng tôi xem xét một tình huống vận chuyển 100 thùng bia từ Sài Gòn ra Hà Nội.

Tác động môi trường của việc vận chuyển bằng xe tải chạy bằng dầu diesel ở Việt Nam là đáng kể nhưng lại có rất ít quy định về khí thải của xe tải, đặc biệt đối với vận tải đường dài như từ Sài Gòn đến Hà Nội.

Chúng tôi trình bày bài toán vận chuyển 100 thùng bia từ Sài Gòn ra Hà Nội, giả sử như sau:

  • Khoảng cách giữa Sài Gòn và Hà Nội là khoảng 1.200 km

  • Việc vận chuyển được thực hiện bằng xe tải chạy bằng dầu diesel có trọng tải 10 tấn (giả sử mỗi thùng bia nặng khoảng 24 kg)

  • Xe tải có mức tiêu thụ nhiên liệu trung bình là 20 lít/100 km và thải ra 2,68 kg CO2/lít dầu diesel được đốt cháy.

Dựa trên những giả định này, tổng lượng dầu diesel tiêu thụ để vận chuyển 100 thùng bia từ Sài Gòn ra Hà Nội sẽ xấp xỉ:

100 thùng x 24 kg mỗi thùng = 2.400 kg

2.400 kg/10 tấn = 0,24 tấn bia

0,24 tấn x 1.200 km = 288 tấn-km

Sử dụng tỷ lệ khí thải 2,68 kg CO2 trên mỗi lít dầu diesel bị đốt cháy, tổng lượng khí thải CO2 từ việc vận chuyển bằng xe tải diesel sẽ là:

288 tấn-km x 0,17 kg CO2/tấn-km x 20 lít/100 km x 2,68 kg CO2/lít = 8.766 kg CO2

Tuy nhiên, ở một quốc gia như Việt Nam, nơi có rất ít quy định về khí thải của xe tải, lượng khí thải thực tế từ xe tải động cơ diesel có thể cao hơn những tính toán trên, vì nhiều xe tải trong nước không có hệ thống kiểm soát khí thải hiện đại hoặc đang sử dụng nhiên liệu diesel chất lượng thấp. Khí thải có thể bao gồm CO2 và các chất gây ô nhiễm có hại khác như nitơ oxit (NOx), hạt vật chất (PM) và sulfur dioxide (SO2).


Những khí thải này có thể có tác động tiêu cực đáng kể đến môi trường và sức khỏe con người, bao gồm ô nhiễm không khí, biến đổi khí hậu, các bệnh về đường hô hấp và các vấn đề về tim mạch.

Kết luận: chúng tôi phải giảm trọng lượng của các lô hàng để giảm tác động tiêu cực chung của việc vận chuyển bằng xe tải tại Việt Nam.


Mục 6: Kinh tế phi chính thức của “ve chai” ở Việt Nam

Ở Việt Nam, có một nền kinh tế phi chính thức gồm những người thu gom rác (hay còn gọi là ve chai) làm công việc loại bỏ và bán lon nhôm từ rác. Trong mục này, chúng ta sẽ đi sâu hơn về tính kinh tế của ve chai và giải pháp làm giảm chất thải chôn lấp.


Công việc thu gom rác, loại bỏ và bán lon nhôm trên thực tế đang mang lại một số lợi ích về kinh tế và môi trường, bao gồm giảm lượng rác chôn lấp và tạo thu nhập cho chính những người nhặt rác.


Lon nhôm có khả năng tái chế cao và có giá trị thị trường cao, khiến chúng trở thành một nguồn tài nguyên quý giá có thể được thu hồi từ dòng chất thải. Tại Việt Nam, nhiều hộ gia đình và doanh nghiệp vứt bỏ lon nhôm đã sử dụng cùng với các loại rác thải khác, hoặc chúng sẽ được đưa đến các bãi chôn lấp hoặc thải ra môi trường. Tuy nhiên, những người nhặt rác thu gom lon nhôm từ rác có thể thu hồi và bán chúng cho các công ty tái chế hoặc các trung gian khác.


Lợi ích kinh tế của việc thu gom đồ hộp nhôm, lon nhôm có thể rất đáng kể, đặc biệt đối với các cá nhân và gia đình có thu nhập thấp, những người không nguồn thu nhập ổn định. Giá trị của lon nhôm có thể khác nhau tùy thuộc vào điều kiện thị trường, nhưng nhìn chung, chúng cao hơn giá thanh toán cho các vật liệu có thể tái chế khác như nhựa hoặc giấy. Bằng việc thu gom và bán lon nhôm, những người nhặt nhạnh có thể kiếm được thu nhập ổn định để có thể nuôi sống bản thân và gia đình của họ.


Ngoài những lợi ích về kinh tế, việc nhặt lon nhôm còn có những lợi ích về môi trường. Bằng cách loại bỏ các lon nhôm khỏi dòng chất thải, những người nhặt rác giúp giảm lượng chất thải tại các bãi chôn lấp, nơi có thể mất nhiều năm để phân hủy và giải phóng các hóa chất độc hại vào môi trường. Ngoài ra, tái chế lon nhôm đòi hỏi ít năng lượng và tài nguyên hơn so với sản xuất lon mới từ nguyên liệu thô, giúp giảm lượng khí thải carbon cho ngành sản xuất đồ uống.



Mục 7: Các vấn đề về nước thải khi rửa chai thủy tinh

Từ năm 2018, chúng tôi đã triển khai chương trình thu hồi và tái sử dụng chai với mục tiêu đảm bảo tất cả các chai có thể tái sử dụng với chất lượng cao. Chúng tôi lấy cảm hứng từ các chương trình tái chế đã đạt được mức độ tái sử dụng cao ở Đức và Oregon.


Khi 7 Bridges mở rộng phạm vi ra ngoài miền Trung, chúng tôi nhận thấy chương trình này không còn hiệu quả. Nhiều khách hàng không có cách nào để lưu trữ chai của họ và chỉ cần đổ chúng vào dòng rác thải. Ngoài ra, việc vận chuyển các chai rỗng đặt ra vấn đề về lượng khí thải carbon như đã thảo luận ở trên. Cuối cùng, tổn thất chai hiện cao hơn 50% do không thể thu hồi và tái sử dụng từ khắp Việt Nam.


Một vấn đề quan trọng mà chúng tôi lưu ý là lượng nước, chất tẩy gây ra các vấn đề như ăn da và lượng nước cần thiết để rửa axit và vệ sinh chai đúng cách. Trong khi ao xử lý nước thải cỏ Vetiver của chúng tôi thực hiện công việc tái chế nước gần như hoàn hảo, nhưng cần một lượng lớn nước ngọt để làm sạch các chai.

Bằng cách chuyển từ chai sang lon, nhà máy bia loại bỏ nhu cầu rửa và tái sử dụng chai. Điều này không chỉ tiết kiệm nước mà còn tiết kiệm năng lượng và hóa chất (chẳng hạn như chất ăn da và nước rửa axit) cần thiết cho quá trình tẩy rửa.


Ước tính rằng một máy rửa chai trung bình sử dụng 3 lít nước cho mỗi chai (Krones, 2021). Ví dụ (sát với thực tế của chúng tôi) để làm sạch hơn 10.000 chai mỗi tháng, chúng tôi sẽ cần khoảng 30.000 lít nước mỗi tháng, hoặc 360.000 lít mỗi năm, để duy trì hệ thống rửa chai. Và…hệ thống của chúng tôi không hiệu quả bằng hệ thống rửa Krones.


Kết luận: với việc thất thoát chai thủy tinh, khí thải vận chuyển, thiếu sự đồng hành của khách hàng trong chương trình của chúng tôi và mức tiêu thụ nước cao, chúng tôi rất tiếc về việc không thể thu hồi và tái sử dụng chai. Với lon nhôm, chúng tôi có thể loại bỏ những vấn đề này và tiết kiệm lượng nước sử dụng.


Nguồn:

  • Aluminum Association and Can Manufacturers Institute (2010). Life Cycle Assessment of Aluminum Beverage Cans.

  • Bren School of Environmental Science & Management (2021). Emissions from Diesel Trucks.

  • Krones (2021). Bottle Washing Technology.

  • Vickers, D. (2011). Environmental Life Cycle Assessment of Drinking Containers. The International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, 16(3), 224-234.





160 views0 comments

Comments


7 Bridges Brewery Logo.png
bottom of page